Our products

Thyme, Lemon

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Has the savory scent of thyme with a sweet, lemony aroma that shines through once its leaves are crushed.

Thyme, English

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Highly aromatic, almost pungent, clover flavor. Like parsley, goes well with almost everything!

Savory, Winter

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Probably the lesser known of the five herbes de provence—thyme, rosemary, lavender, & marjoram. Savory is reminiscent of thyme but easier to use for its tender, longer leaves.

Sage, Purple

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Offers aromatic, velvety, purple-toned leaves. Mainly seen in the company of turkey or pork, sage also accents fruit-based vinegars and vinaigrettes.

Sage, Nazareth

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Aromatic leaves and pale lavender flower spikes in the Spring. Mainly seen in the company of turkey or pork, sage also accents fruit-based vinegars and vinaigrettes.

Sage, Berggarten

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Better know as common sage, has soft gray-green leaves. Mainly seen in the company of turkey or pork, sage also accents fruit-based vinegars and vinaigrettes.

Lemongrass

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A staple in South-East Asian cuisines, where it is often mixed with garlic, shallots, and ginger to make flavorful pastes. Its unique citrus aroma can be found in curries, soups, and even cold drinks.

Lemon Verbena

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Crush a leaf in your hands and it's captivating floral-citrus scent will accompany you all day. This energizing, graceful herb is a delightful addition to sorbets, cakes, fruit syrups and ice cream, also excellent with fish.

Leaf Celery

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Leaf Celery is a doppelganger for flat leaf parsley but its peppery celery aroma gives it away. Taste is similar to stalk celery, but slightly stronger and herbier. Amazing in chicken salad, brightens every dish.

Fennel Fronds

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Looks a lot like dill, but has a much stronger aniseed flavor. You can toss them in a salad, juice them up, make a pesto with a twist, or pair up with fish.

Bay Leaf

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Queen of soups and stews for its unmistakable fragrance. Fresh Bay leaves are usually stronger than dried ones, emitting an aromatic, even pungent taste to dishes.